RECENT REVIEWS & ENDORSEMENTS

  • Pursuit of Ordinary, The
    Nigel Jay Cooper
    The story gripped me right from the beginning. The debate between the supernatural and mental health issues was well played out through the multidimensional characters. Can hope come from a tragedy? Is it real or an illusion? I found the story extremely emotional at times. Death and grief are one of the greatest challenges we experience as a human being. This and the hope, false or real, makes us very vulnerable. This is so well depicted in this book. It was sometimes difficult for me to read as it was an anniversary of a terrible loss for me, but I did find cathartic to follow the story to its conclusion. ~ Sue Ross, Goodreads

  • Pursuit of Ordinary, The
    Nigel Jay Cooper
    When Natalie’s husband Joe is killed in a freak traffic accident, she is cast adrift but before long she is sought out by homeless Dan who she recognises from the accident scene. But the problem is that Dan is insisting that the spirit of Joe has entered his body and has asked him to find her so they can be together again. As a witness to the incident that changed her life forever, Natalie needs to know what Dan saw of that night.

    The story flicks between the perspective of Natalie, Dan and Joe, and is sometimes told through conversations Joe and Dan have together.

    A brilliant story of perceptions, all in the pursuit of ordinary.
    ~ Fiona Moreira, Goodreads

  • Pursuit of Ordinary, The
    Nigel Jay Cooper
    An excellent read... it gripped me from the opening paragraph and kept me on the hook while the complexities of the plot unfolded. The characters are well-written and you find yourself drawn into their lives and desperate to see how (or if) it all works out for them. Five stars. ~ Customer, Amazon

  • Made in Brooklyn
    Amanda Wasielewski
    This was a great book. Highly researched, Made in Brooklyn offers a perspective on how and why makers culture took over bad areas of NY (and other cities in the world - the motives seem applicable in most big cities with hip neighbourhoods) and transformed them into middle-class, eclectic, gentrified areas. I'll recommend this book to all of my friends who believe that buying triple organic vegetables is better than (average) organic products from local markets.
    ~ Silvia Patriche , NetGalley

  • Pursuit of Ordinary, The
    Nigel Jay Cooper
    This is an intriguing book. Can the spirit of one person transfer and live on in another? The premise seems ridiculous. The main characters first come in to view at the scene of a fatal road accident where this appears to have happened and then their fates are entwined forever. Initially, the story was not convincing to me as a reader and I almost put it aside but as the plot progressed I found myself engaging with it more. The dialogue between Dan and Joe and the interactions with Natalie are well-written and clever. As we see two damaged and vulnerable characters attempt to change their lives, we gain an insight into how ordinary people deal what befalls them... An emotional and ultimately positive read.
    ~ Linda Parry, NetGalley

  • Karna's Wheel
    Michael Tobert
    Charles Dickens had his Tale of Two Cities. Michael Tobert’s Karna’s Wheel is a different narrative altogether but it too revolves round two cities. The plot brings together the royal burgh of Dundee in Scotland and the sprawling metropolis of Calcutta [Kolkata] in Bengal. The two cities were the twin centers for the global production of jute [burlap] sacking and cloth which for a hundred years or so were used to ship food and commodities to the four corners of the world. Tobert’s engaging story weaves together the gritty world of jute mills with the eternal truths (and half-truths) about the human predicament from the greatest of all Hindu epics The Mahabharata. This improbable linking illuminates Tobert’s characters who have to make their way through life in the dark underbelly of the industry where wage cruelty and sexual exploitation are rife. Set in the 1920s and 1930s and deploying a radical narrative technique, with occasional touches of magic realism, this is historical fiction at the cutting edge. And to add icing to the cake, just as Meghan Markle stirred up the Royal Family by marrying into it, the Dundee protganist of Tobert’s story discovers his Bengali origins. ~ Gordon T Stewart, Professor Emeritus of History at Michigan State University and author of 'Jute and Empire'.

  • Karna's Wheel
    Michael Tobert
    A bravura performance in terms of style and structure ... historical fiction at the cutting edge. ~ Gordon T Stewart, Professor Emeritus of History at Michigan State University and author of 'Jute and Empire'.

  • Feral Chickens
    C. McGee
    A relaxing book about an exotic island that you should consider taking with you to the beach. ~ Reading Badger, Reading Badger

  • Road to Power, The
    Barbara Berger
    This is a lovely little book full of short, simple and practical advise. Lots of different topics such as health and work all with teachings on how to embrace your own power within them. Great for when you need to start taking back control of your life. ~ Kirsty White, For the love of books!!

  • Kitchen Witchcraft: Spells & Charms
    Rachel Patterson
    This is a great book for anyone looking to make positive changes to their lives that have a passion for magic and witchcraft. One thing I did like was that the ingredients you need for the spells are items are ones that most people will have at home anyway making it easy to gather everything needed without spending a fortune. A really interesting read and I may give one or two recipes a tray! ~ Kirsty White, For the love of books!!

  • Justice Gone
    N. Lombardi Jr.
    Praise for THE PLAIN OF JARS: 'The writing is picturesque, cinematic, vivid, and sharp...a splendid achievement. A well-researched, finely crafted novel.' ~ Richard Crasta, author

  • Pursuit of Ordinary, The
    Nigel Jay Cooper
    Beautifully written book. Very well written characters. Very different to anything I have read before. Highly recommended. ~ Jodi H, NetGalley

  • Pursuit of Ordinary, The
    Nigel Jay Cooper
    Such a pleasure to read a story so unique and compelling. It is written so beautifully, with the characters coming to life with each page. I've never read a book like this and loved the sensitive handling of such a complex condition..Simply Superb! ~ Samantha M, NetGalley

  • Pursuit of Ordinary, The
    Nigel Jay Cooper
    Nigel Jay Cooper's sophomore novel The Pursuit of Ordinary is an extraordinary (sorry ;)) work of fiction conveying a unique story about an atypical relationship (or more a relationship triangle?).

    Dan, a homeless man, witnessed a car accident that killed Joe, Natalie's husband. Now Dan can't forget seeing Natalie cradle her dying husband, and there is this new voice in Dan's head. Natalie's dead husband, Joe? Dan has to get in touch with Natalie. In this character-driven tale Nigel Jay Cooper explores pertinent topics relating to mental health, such as grief and loss, homelessness, relationships and abuse.

    This author has a genuine talent for creating characters that feel like real people who could be living next door to you. They may not necessarily be characters you particularly like or whose actions you always understand and support, but they feel completely authentic. The dialogue is believable and the plot emotional; sometimes sad but also very funny in parts. It contained some good twists and turns that kept me turning the pages anxiously.

    The story is told from three (or perhaps two?) perspectives and my main reason for deducting a star is the slightly repetitive nature of some of the chapters, where we hear Dan's perspective and then are told the same scenario again but from Natalie's point of view. Obviously there are differences in the way Dan and Natalie view their subjective reality, and I understand the different perspectives were required to show that, but it was frustrating reading at times.

    I felt this book was way more positive than last year's debut Beat the Rain which floored me and left me shattered by the end of it. This was a lovely, heartfelt story that tackles difficult subjects with sensitivity and without being preachy, and it all leads to a very satisfactory ending. After two very special books, Nigel Jay Cooper is a must-read author for me. ~ Petra A, Goodreads

  • Feral Chickens
    C. McGee
    I thoroughly enjoyed this story, although when I began reading I could not imagine how a story about feral chickens could entertain me! A well written, original idea for a story. ~ Margaret Wilkins, NetGalley

  • Meaning of Trump, The
    Brian Francis Culkin
    The election of Donald Trump was a shattering moment to the political sensibilities of America; immediately sending the country into a frenzy of commentary, critique, and a never-ending media coverage that has bordered on the absurd. But the question still remains: what does it all mean?
    The Meaning of Trump is an ideological critique that sees the election of Donald Trump as a completely natural progression to the general trajectory of digitized technologies, neoliberalism, and a new breed of financialized capitalism; destructive global forces that know no party affiliation or national boundary. Although Donald Trump is undoubtedly the symptom that has exploded to the surface after nearly four decades of failed policies and broken promises by both Republicans and Democrats alike, his election can also be seen as an existential fork in the road for both the United States and even humanity itself.
    What path is taken still remains to be seen.

    Read this book --- it is definitely an education! (and not one from TrumpU!)

    ~ Janet Cousineau

  • Western Philosophy Made Easy
    Dennis Waite
    Approachable - ideal for a beginner who is dipping their toe into the water of philosophy and wondering which areas might be of interest for them to explore. I for one am off to seek out Spinoza! ~ Alison Cross, NetGalley

  • Friday's Child
    Brian Mountford
    Friday’s Child: Poems of suffering and redemption by Brian Mountford
    16 MARCH 2018

    BRIAN MOUNTFORD’s Friday’s Child: Poems of suffering and redemption (Christian Alternative, £8.99 (£8.10); 978-1-78535-741-1) is a literary anthology of 40 items for Good Friday, with commentary: e.g. famous hymns and prayers, poems by Donne, Hopkins, Larkin, and Carol Ann Duffy, and prose by Lancelot Andrewes and T. S. Eliot. ~ , church times

  • Feral Chickens
    C. McGee
    What a cool book. I loved it, the writing, the language, the characters, the story. It is one of those books that is totally unique and purely entertaining and pleasurable. It reminded me of the Scandinavian stories that aren't in a hurry but take you on a glorious journey, you just have to sit back and enjoy it.
    I can't not comment on the insults - hilarious! I now have a great range of names to hurl that will bring a smile and diffuse my anger! ~ Samantha Mortimer, NetGalley

  • Pilgrimage on the Path of Love
    Barbara Ann Briggs
    " I really love this book and will recommend it for everyone who loves wisdom. The book is well written and very inspiring to read."
    ~ Einar Ostymyren, Swedish Engineer

©2016 John Hunt Publishing Ltd.