Unmaking Merlin

Unmaking Merlin

Anarchist Tendencies in English Literature

A unique exploration of how anarchist philosophy and practice has inspired some of the English language's most revered, and reviled, authors.


CATEGORIZED IN

A unique exploration of how anarchist philosophy and practice has inspired some of the English language's most revered, and reviled, authors.

REVIEWS & ENDORSEMENTS

'Murphy is remarkably erudite for such a young scholar. Though not even 25 years old, he zooms with apparent ease and familiarity from George Orwell to Friedrich Nietzsche to James Joyce to Christopher Hitchens ... The book is wide-ranging, touching on a number of themes – including education, representative democracy, the New Atheism, corporate power, crime, and poststructuralism. Throughout, Murphy does a good job of showing that the popular association of anarchism with violence and chaos is deeply inaccurate. He shows that the central concerns of anarchists have always been self-determination, mutual aid, and an end to structural violence.' ~ Tom Malleson, author of After Occupy: Economic Democracy for the 21st Century, https://ceasefiremagazine.co.uk/review-unmaking-merlin-anarchist-tendencies-english-literature-zero-books//

Elliot Murphy is a superb guide and analyst of the repressed and marginalised anarchist tradition in British culture. His fresh readings of both renowned and obscure writers and the historical political undercurrents with which they engaged will intrigue scholars and activists interested in politics and culture. The relevance of these concerns to our current neoliberal condition renders this a gripping and important book. ~ Anita Biressi, co-author of 'Class and Contemporary British Culture'

ABOUT THE AUTHOR.
Elliot Murphy
Elliot Murphy Elliot Murphy was born in Liverpool in 1991, and is a postgraduate Linguistics student at the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, ...
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