Positive Realism

Positive Realism

Things exist, and therefore undoubtedly resist us, but in doing so they offer affordances, resources, opportunities.


CATEGORIZED IN

Positive Realism could be seen as the "sequel" to Maurizio Ferraris' Manifesto of New Realism and Introduction to New Realism. The focus here is the other side of unamendability: a notion, described in his previous books, according to which reality is "unamendable", it cannot be corrected at will. This "resistance" of the real is what ultimately tells us that, in opposition to the claims of post-Kantian philosophy, the world is not a result of our conceptual work: if it were so, our power over reality would be much greater. Now, the often disappointing limits that the real sets against our expectations are also a resource: and this is the key point of the present book. Things exist, and therefore undoubtedly resist us, but in doing so they offer affordances, resources, opportunities. And that the greatest opportunity, which underlies all the other ones, is the fact that we share a world that is far from liquid: on the contrary, it provides the solid ground on which everything rests, starting from our happiness or unhappiness.

REVIEWS & ENDORSEMENTS

Ferraris showed great courage in the brutally anti-realist continental philosophy of the early 1990s. He argues rigorously, and is also an erudite and cultured person with an unusually good sense of humor. The combination of Ferraris and his students (in Italy) and Gabriel and his students (in Germany) helps add much-needed geographic diversity to a so far mostly Anglo-Francophone continental realist surge, which will help bring continental realism one step closer to a global philosophical movement. ~ Graham Harman

ABOUT THE AUTHOR.
Maurizio Ferraris
Maurizio Ferraris Maurizio Ferraris is full Professor of Philosophy at the University of Turin, where he is also the Director of the LabOnt (Laboratory for On...
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